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Moon Trip: A Personal Account of the Apollo Program and its Science

Large book cover: Moon Trip: A Personal Account of the Apollo Program and its Science

Moon Trip: A Personal Account of the Apollo Program and its Science
by

Publisher: Lunar and Planetary Institute
ISBN/ASIN: B0006ES3P4
Number of pages: 162

Description:
The excitement of the Apollo program was that it accomplished a bold leap from the surface of the Earth to the Moon. The deed challenged our technology and engineering skill. Deliberate preparations are being made now for another and even more daring leap.

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