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Computational Fluid Dynamics

Small book cover: Computational Fluid Dynamics

Computational Fluid Dynamics
by

Publisher: BookBoon
ISBN-13: 9788776814304
Number of pages: 133

Description:
This book provides the basics of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) appropriate to modern day undergraduate study. The aim is to bridge the gap between books focusing on detailed theoretical analysis and commercial software user's guides which do not contain significant theory. The book provides the reader with the theoretical background of basic CFD methods without going into deep detail into the mathematics or numerical algorithms.

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